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The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

From smartly dressed passengers to fancy in-flight meals, flying was exciting and glamorous. Join the jet-setters of yesteryear in these vintage airline ads.

The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

Martin Aircraft, 1945

The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

Boeing, 1946

The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

Trans World Airline, 1946

The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

Stinson, 1947

The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

American Airlines, 1949

The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

American Airlines, 1950

The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

Douglas, 1952

The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

Air France, 1960

The Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

Boeing, 1964

The Jet Set: Vintage airline adsThe Jet Set: Vintage airline adsThe Jet Set: Vintage airline adsThe Jet Set: Vintage airline adsThe Jet Set: Vintage airline adsThe Jet Set: Vintage airline adsThe Jet Set: Vintage airline adsThe Jet Set: Vintage airline adsThe Jet Set: Vintage airline ads

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Mary Abnderson April 28, 2014 at 10:25 am

wow, the food looks great, but no seat belts……love the way passengers
were dressed up to travel

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Gil May 23, 2014 at 6:59 pm

As somebody who does remember this period quite well, I would point out three differences that keep me from being nostalgic about ’40′s and ’50′s airline travel:
(1) It was expensive. I could take a private-room Pullman from home to school for what a flight cost.
(2) It was dangerous. Planes had an unfortunate tendency to crash.
(3) Reciprocating engine planes were, to put it gently, not exactly steady in the air. I seldom had a flight on one that didn’t result in the use of a barf bag, and I have never been sick on a jet. And have flown on most models ever since the 707 and the VC-10.

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Ed July 11, 2014 at 11:48 am

The advance in air frames and power plants in forty years after the Wright brothers first flight is quite an advancement in forty years.. In spite of some air accidents , take a look at the flight record of the DC3 as a commercial airliner. Only one accident which was due to pilot error. They’re still flying to this day. That also would include Henry Ford’s all metal three engine transport plane. As a poster in the nose of a B-24 parked at Teterboro Airport said, ” Jets Are For Kids!”

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